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CoastLab 2016 Organizers

Bill Baird

     Under the auspices of:
         
   
   
   
   
 
Keynote Lecture: Thoughts on the future of Physical Modelling on Coastal Engineering
With over 45 years of varied international experience in the fields of coastal and marine engineering, Mr. Baird provides overall management and high level direction/review on large, complex coastal and marine engineering projects, as well as specialized technical expertise.  Mr.Baird has overseen the development of conventional and non-conventional designs for over one hundred rubblemound breakwaters, revetments, offshore structures and other complex coastal engineering projects requiring the support of both physical and numerical modelling.   

Mr. Baird has been involved in various research studies over the past forty years on various aspects related to the design of different types of breakwaters, and he has published extensively on the subject.  He was a pioneer in the development of the modern day berm breakwater, using comprehensive physical model tests to develop and prove the concept for several sites, leading to the construction of the first berm breakwater at Keflavik, Iceland in the mid-1980s.  Through the 1980s and into the 1990s, Mr. Baird led research efforts to develop physical modeling techniques to determine wave forces on breakwater armour units, and the associated movements and wave-induced stresses within the armour units.  Recently, he has provided direction and review for similar research being undertaken using numerical models, specifically computational fluid dynamics and structural dynamics models; the ultimate objective of this research is to develop a “virtual wave flume”.   

Mr. Baird has been an invited lecturer on the design of breakwaters at Queen's University, the University of Wisconsin, and the University College of Los Angeles. We are honoured to have him at the University of Ottawa to his discuss his vast experience and knowledge in the field of coastal engineering, as well as where he sees our field heading in the future.